Baystate Health print this page

Frequently Asked Questions


About Us

Can you tell me more about the BMC Donor Egg Program?


Confidentiality

Is egg donation confidential?


Egg Donation Process

What exactly does the egg donation process involve?


Egg Donors

Who uses donor eggs?


May I use my friend as an egg donor?


Where do anonymous donor eggs come from?


Should we tell our child that we used an egg donor?


Lifestyle Changes

Will I have to change my lifestyle or behaviors during an egg donation cycle?


Payment

What do you pay egg donors?


Screening

What is the screening procedure?


About Us

Can you tell me more about the BMC Donor Egg Program?

Baystate Medical Center's In-Vitro Fertilization program began in 1990 and later added the Donor Egg Program in 1998.

 

The program participates in the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technologies and is fully accredited by the College of American Pathologists.

 

Our reproductive endocrinologists, nurses and other professionals are well-trained in reproductive procedures.

 

Baystate Reproductive Medicine recruits, interviews and screens potential egg donors.

 

The donor egg team gets to know both donors and recipients prior to the matching process.

 

Recipient couples have the option of using know donors, such as friends who volunteer, but these known donors must go through the same screening process by the Donor Egg Program as anonymous donors.

 

Return to top


Confidentiality

Is egg donation confidential?

The entire process is confidential and discreet:

  • We safeguard the privacy of the information you share with us during the screening process.

  

  • We do not reveal your identity to recipients or prospective recipients.  Sometimes, with the donor's permission, we show the recipient a baby picture of the donor, but never an adult photo.

  

  • Donors and recipients never meet.

  

  • Baystate Reproductive Medicine will not match egg donors with more than one recipient in any given community.

 

Return to top


Egg Donation Process

What exactly does the egg donation process involve?

The egg donation process is simple and relatively painless for most donors.

Your time -We will ask you to come in three or four times before 9:30 a.m. during the nearly three weeks prior to egg retrieval for monitoring and tests.

 

The process prior to egg retrieval involves:

  • 10-12 days of self-administered hormone injections to induce ovaries to produce several eggs per cycle (instead of one).
  • Ultrasound and blood screening to monitor egg development.
  • A different hormone injection to stimulate ovulation.

 

Egg retrieval procedure -This is a day stay procedure in the IVF Unit at the Chestnut Surgery Center.  You will not have to stay overnight, and you will be able to return to work or your usual activities by the following day.

Once egg retrieval is done, your donation process is complete.  You will need to have a follow-up ultrasound approximately two weeks after the retrieval.

 

Return to top


Egg Donors

Who uses donor eggs?

Dr. Halina Wiczyk says:

Women who are missing ovaries from birth, those who have had their ovaries surgically removed or women whose ovaries no longer produce healthy eggs are all candidates for donor eggs.

 

A donor egg cycle is an IVF cycle that involved two women. The donor's ovaries are stimulated and mature eggs are retrieved. The donor eggs are combined with the recipient couple’s sperm, and the resulting embryos are transferred into the recipient woman’s uterus in the hope that implantation and pregnancy will occur.

 

Return to top


May I use my friend as an egg donor?

Dr. Halina Wiczyk says:

Some women who need donor eggs decide to use a known egg donor.

 

Known donors are frequently relatives, but can also be friends or acquaintances.

 

Known donors must be screened the same way that anonymous donors are screened and must fit within the inftertility programs' donor eligibility standards.

 

Compensation may or may not be provided to known egg donors.

 

Return to top


Where do anonymous donor eggs come from?

Dr. Halina Wiczyk says:

Most egg donors are healthy young women who are recruited and screened by fertility programs. The program matches these anonymous egg donors with recipient individuals or couples.

 

Egg donors usually undergo required medical and psychological testing, as well as cycle monitoring at the same program as the recipient. Additionally, there are independent agencies that recruit potential egg donors and arrange for their screening.

 

Most agencies will provide identifying donor information to recipients. Anonymous donors are provided monetary compensation. It is important that you are comfortable with how your egg donor has been recruited and screened.

 

Return to top


Should we tell our child that we used an egg donor?

Dr. Halina Wiczyk says:

That is up to you. In the past, families were not encouraged to tell children that donor sperm was used in their conception. Today however, many parents and health care professionals advise giving this information to the children.

 

Studies show that secrecy within families can be harmful. With more and more families using donor sperm, donor eggs and donor embryos, there is an increasing amount of support for informing children of their genetic origins.

 

Return to top


Lifestyle Changes

Will I have to change my lifestyle or behaviors during an egg donation cycle?

  • Work/normal daily activity -You may work and maintain usual activity during the cycle.  However you will need to visit the program three or four early mornings during the cycle and take the day off for retrieval.

  

  • Sexual relations -We encourage donors to refrain from sexual intercourse from retrieval to next menses (approximately two weeks).

    

  • Breast feeding -Women will not be accepted as donors while they are breast feeding.

  

  • Diet -We encourage donors to maintain a healthy diet during the cycle.

  

  • Exercise/physical activity -You may maintain your normal routine. 

  

  • Alcohol -We encourage donors to refrain from drinking alcohol during stimulation. 

  

  • Prescription drugs -Please make sure you discuss all your current medications with your Program physician and follow his/her advice. 

  

  • Recreational drugs -Donors must not use recreational drugs.

 

Return to top


Payment

What do you pay egg donors?

Baystate's Egg Donor Program pays donors $7,000 upon completion of egg retrieval.   NOTE:  From initial application to egg retrieval takes about three months.

 

If retrieval is complete, but no eggs are retrieved, the donor will still receive $7,000. 

 

If ovarian stimulation is started but not completed, the donor will receive $750.

 

Donors receive payment whether or not their eggs result in the birth of a baby.

 

There are no medical costs to donors or their health insurers.  Supplemental insurance is purchased by the recipient to cover the donor through the course of the donor egg treatment cycle.  All other medical costs are paid by the program.

Return to top


Screening

What is the screening procedure?

Donors are screened extensively to assure that they are both physically and emotionally appropriate for the Donor Egg Program.  There are several steps to the screening process:

  • Preliminary online application
  • Telephone interview
  • Detailed written questionnaire
  • Psychological evaluation
  • Nursing consultation
  • Blood screening
  • Meeting with a Reproductive Endocrinologist
  • Consultation and physical exam with a Reproductive Endocrinologist

 

We never share a donor's identity with recipients or prospective recipients.

 

Return to top