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Stroke Care

What is a stroke?  The two main types of stroke are ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke.  Ischemic stroke occurs when a blood clot forms that blocks blood flow to part of the brain.  A hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel on the brain's surface or in the brain ruptures and fills the surrounding areas with blood.  Without blood and the oxygen it carries, brain cells start to die.  Brain damage can begin within minutes.  It is important to know the symptoms of stroke and act fast as quick treatment can help limit damage to the brain and increase the chance of a full recovery.

 

Over 1,200 patients each year are admitted to Baystate Health (BH) facilities for evaluation and treatment of ischemic stroke.  Each of the three BH hospitals is a designated Primary Stroke Center (PSC) by the Department of Public Heath for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as well as an active participant in the Stroke Register and the Stroke Collaborative Reaching for Excellence (SCORE) Project.  

 

All Baystate Health facilities publicly report Stroke care data.  This reporting helps to ensure that every patient who comes to BH with a stroke receives all appropriate treatments to reduce sickness and death. 

STROKE Care Measures

 

HIGHER IS BETTER  

Baystate Medical Center Best U.S. Hospitals*
October - December 2012
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis by hospital day 2:  Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in a deep vein, most often in the legs.  When a clot breaks off and travels to the lungs (embolization), it is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and can be life-threatening.  Together, a DVT and PE are known as venous thromboembolism.  It is important for patients with stroke to receive the right treatment to prevent blood clots from forming.

 

97.6%

 

95.1%

Discharged on antithrombotic therapy:  Antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) prescribed at discharge for patients who have had an ischemic stroke may help to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death. 100% 99.1%
Anticoagulation therapy for Atrial fibrillation/flutter:  Atrial fibrillation (A-fib)/Atrial flutter are types of irregular heartbeats and are major risk factors for stroke because the irregular heartbeat allows the blood to pool in the heart. This pooled blood tends to form clots which can then be carried to the brain, causing a stroke. It is important to treat patients with A-fib/flutter with the right medications (anticoagulants) that prevent blood clots from forming to avoid strokes. 100% 94.8%
Treatment within 3 hours for patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrive within 2 hours of symptom onset:  t-PA is a "clot-busting" medication used in patients with ischemic stroke to help reduce the effects of a stroke.  It must be given within 3 hours of the start of stroke symptoms to be most effective. 100% 84.4%
Antithrombotic therapy by end of hospital day 2: It is important to give antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) within 48 hours of being admitted to the hospital for ischemic stroke to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death. 100% 98.2%
Discharged on statin medication:  It is important to reduce the bad cholesterol (LDL) levels in the blood to less than 100 mg/dl.  Using LDL-lowering medications, such as statins, can decrease the chance of future strokes and heart attacks. 95.6% 95.2%
Stroke education:   It is important for patients with stroke or their caregivers to receive educational materials during their stay that talk about which medications to take after discharge, follow-up doctor's appointments after discharge, risk factors, warning signs and symptoms of stroke, and what to do in an emergency after discharge. 98.6% 94.6%
Assessed for rehabilitation:  It is important for patients with stroke to be evaluated to see if they need rehabilitation services. 100% 97.9%
Composite Process Score: A summary score of how often we provide each of the above-listed recommended measures to patients based on their specific conditions. 98% 94.8%
Appropriate Care Score:  A score that summarizes whether patients received all of the appropriate treatments that they should have based on their specific conditions. 90.6% 78.4%

*Benchmark Massachusetts Stroke Hospitals' Average

 

For more information on Quality at Baystate Health

For more information on Baystate Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Franklin Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Mary Lane Hospital

For more information on Stroke Massachusetts or American Stroke Association

For more information on the American Heart Association

STROKE Care Measures

 

HIGHER IS BETTER  

Baystate Franklin Medical Center Best U.S. Hospitals*
October - December 2012
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis by hospital day 2:  Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in a deep vein, most often in the legs.  When a clot breaks off and travels to the lungs (embolization), it is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and can be life-threatening.  Together, a DVT and PE are known as venous thromboembolism.  It is important for patients with stroke to receive the right treatment to prevent blood clots from forming.

 

100%

 

95.1%

Discharged on antithrombotic therapy:  Antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) prescribed at discharge for patients who have had an ischemic stroke may help to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death. 100% 99.1%
Anticoagulation therapy for Atrial fibrillation/flutter:  Atrial fibrillation (A-fib)/Atrial flutter are types of irregular heartbeats and are major risk factors for stroke because the irregular heartbeat allows the blood to pool in the heart. This pooled blood tends to form clots which can then be carried to the brain, causing a stroke. It is important to treat patients with A-fib/flutter with the right medications (anticoagulants) that prevent blood clots from forming to avoid strokes. 100% 94.8%
Treatment within 3 hours for patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrive within 2 hours of symptom onset:  t-PA is a "clot-busting" medication used in patients with ischemic stroke to help reduce the effects of a stroke.  It must be given within 3 hours of the start of stroke symptoms to be most effective. 100% 84.4%
Antithrombotic therapy by end of hospital day 2: It is important to give antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) within 48 hours of being admitted to the hospital for ischemic stroke to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death.

 

100%

 

98.2%

Discharged on statin medication:  It is important to reduce the bad cholesterol (LDL) levels in the blood to less than 100 mg/dl.  Using LDL-lowering medications, such as statins, can decrease the chance of future strokes and heart attacks.

 

93.8%

 

95.2%

Stroke education:   It is important for patients with stroke or their caregivers to receive educational materials during their stay that talk about which medications to take after discharge, follow-up doctor's appointments after discharge, risk factors, warning signs and symptoms of stroke, and what to do in an emergency after discharge. 100% 94.6%
Assessed for rehabilitation:  It is important for patients with stroke to be evaluated to see if they need rehabilitation services. 100% 97.9%
Composite Process Score: A summary score of how often we provide each of the above-listed recommended measures to patients based on their specific conditions. 96.6% 94.8%
Appropriate Care Score:  A score that summarizes whether patients received all of the appropriate treatments that they should have based on their specific conditions. 84% 78.4%

*Benchmark Massachusetts Stroke Hospitals' Average

 

For more information on Quality at Baystate Health

For more information on Baystate Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Franklin Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Mary Lane Hospital

For more information on Stroke Massachusetts or American Stroke Association

For more information on the American Heart Association

STROKE Care Measures

 

HIGHER IS BETTER  

Baystate Mary Lane Hospital Best U.S. Hospitals*
October - December 2012
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis by hospital day 2:  Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in a deep vein, most often in the legs.  When a clot breaks off and travels to the lungs (embolization), it is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and can be life-threatening.  Together, a DVT and PE are known as venous thromboembolism.  It is important for patients with stroke to receive the right treatment to prevent blood clots from forming.

 

100%

 

95.1%

Discharged on antithrombotic therapy:  Antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) prescribed at discharge for patients who have had an ischemic stroke may help to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death. 100% 99.1%
Anticoagulation therapy for Atrial fibrillation/flutter:  Atrial fibrillation (A-fib)/Atrial flutter are types of irregular heartbeats and are major risk factors for stroke because the irregular heartbeat allows the blood to pool in the heart. This pooled blood tends to form clots which can then be carried to the brain, causing a stroke. It is important to treat patients with A-fib/flutter with the right medications (anticoagulants) that prevent blood clots from forming to avoid strokes. 100% 94.8%
Treatment within 3 hours for patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrive within 2 hours of symptom onset:  t-PA is a "clot-busting" medication used in patients with ischemic stroke to help reduce the effects of a stroke.  It must be given within 3 hours of the start of stroke symptoms to be most effective. 100% 84.4%
Antithrombotic therapy by end of hospital day 2: It is important to give antithrombotic therapy (medication used to prevent blood clots) within 48 hours of being admitted to the hospital for ischemic stroke to lower the risk of having another stroke and complications from stroke, including death. 85.7% 98.2%
Discharged on statin medication:  It is important to reduce the bad cholesterol (LDL) levels in the blood to less than 100 mg/dl.  Using LDL-lowering medications, such as statins, can decrease the chance of future strokes and heart attacks. 100% 95.2%
Stroke education:   It is important for patients with stroke or their caregivers to receive educational materials during their stay that talk about which medications to take after discharge, follow-up doctor's appointments after discharge, risk factors, warning signs and symptoms of stroke, and what to do in an emergency after discharge. 100% 94.6%
Assessed for rehabilitation:  It is important for patients with stroke to be evaluated to see if they need rehabilitation services. 100% 97.9%
Composite Process Score: A summary score of how often we provide each of the above-listed recommended measures to patients based on their specific conditions. 94.7% 94.8%
Appropriate Care Score:  A score that summarizes whether patients received all of the appropriate treatments that they should have based on their specific conditions. 81.8% 78.4%

*Benchmark Massachusetts Stroke Hospitals' Average

 

For more information on Quality at Baystate Health

For more information on Baystate Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Franklin Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Mary Lane Hospital

For more information on Stroke Massachusetts or American Stroke Association

For more information on the American Heart Association

 

 

   

 

 

For more information on Quality at Baystate Health

For more information on Baystate Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Franklin Medical Center

For more information on Baystate Mary Lane Hospital

For more information on Stroke Massachusetts or American Stroke Association

For more information on the American Heart Association