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Frequently Asked Questions


About the Pediatrics Residency

How would you classify Baystate Children's Hospital?


How do your residents do on the American Board of Pediatrics Certifying Examinations?


What do your graduates do after residency?


How many residents and fellows are in the Department of Pediatrics?


How involved are residents in decisions about the pediatrics residency program?


Are there opportunities to do a research or advocacy project?


How are we supported in our teaching of medical students?


Do the pediatric residents participate in simulation training?


Are there any unique features of the continuity clinic?


What is the call schedule on different rotations?


How have the new guidelines for resident work hours impacted the pediatrics residency program?


How does the program deal with resident stress?


About Residencies or Fellowships

How many residency and fellowship programs does Baystate Medical Center have?


Are residents involved in teaching medical students?


Do residents have a voice in decision-making?


Are there opportunities to meet residents and fellows from other departments?


What library resources are available?


Where do we eat at the hospital?


Where do we park?


About Baystate Medical Center

Where is Baystate Medical Center?


How does Baystate promote diversity and inclusion in the workplace?


Will Baystate help my significant other find employment?


Is Baystate a "green" workplace?


Does Baystate provide child care?


About Springfield and the Surrounding Community

What's it like to live there?


Where should I live?


About the Pediatrics Residency

How would you classify Baystate Children's Hospital?

Baystate Children’s Hospital is a children’s hospital within a hospital that is a university-affiliated medical center.  In fact, it is the largest teaching hospital in the Tufts University system. It is an academic medical center which supports teaching of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Tufts medical students, residents, fellows, senior physicians and other health professionals. 


Faculty and residents participate in clinical, epidemiological and basic research.


Baystate Children's Hospital serves as the community hospital for a large number of pediatricians, and also is the tertiary care medical center for the Western Massachusetts region.

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How do your residents do on the American Board of Pediatrics Certifying Examinations?

Residents from Baystate have done very well on the Board Exam. Over the last 4 years, 82% have passed the examination as first-time takers.

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What do your graduates do after residency?

Although this varies year-to-year, about half of our residents go into general pediatrics practice and half go on to fellowship training in a pediatric subspecialty. 


Our residents have been very successful obtaining fellowships of their choice. In the last 15 years, our graduates have entered fellowships at institutions such as, Boston University, Children’s Hospital Boston, Children's Hospital Philadelphia, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Duke University, Johns Hopkins, MGH,  Pittsburgh, UC San Diego, University of North Carolina, Vancouver Children's Hospital, Vanderbilt, and Yale, in subspecialties from Alternative and Complementary Medicine to Critical Care, from Neonatology to Sports Medicine, from Emergency Medicine to Hematology/Oncology. See Pediatric Residency Graduates page for complete information.

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How many residents and fellows are in the Department of Pediatrics?

There are 12 residents per year in our 3 year program, and only 2 fellows each year—one each in Pediatric Emergency Medicine and Pediatric Endocrinology. We are a resident-focused program.

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How involved are residents in decisions about the pediatrics residency program?

Our residents are adult learners who help determine how our program operates. We meet as a program once a month in our curriculum committee meetings where we discuss topics of concern to the residency. Four times a year, these meetings are just for residents with the chief residents. If a big change is considered, we survey all of the residents before the change is made, if possible. We also do follow-up surveys to assess whether people are happy with the changes.

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Are there opportunities to do a research or advocacy project?

Most medical students come into residency with experience in research or community service. We feel it is important for you to be able to continue in these areas of interest. 


All of our residents do a project over their three years. It can be in the area of clinical research, community advocacy, public health, or education. Each resident works with a faculty mentor. In the spring of the PL3 year, each resident gives a short presentation at Grand Rounds about his/her project. These presentations have been uniformly well-received. 


In fact, every year, a large subset of our residents present abstract posters and/or platform presentations at national meetings.  There is monetary support from the program to support resident presentations at national meetings. 

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How are we supported in our teaching of medical students?

Since Baystate Medical Center is the Western Campus of Tufts University School of Medicine, each resident is granted a Clinical Instructor faculty appointment. The Pediatrics Residency program has a curriculum we cover in our academic half-days to develop our residents as educators. Education is core to our identity in pediatrics; we are educators and strive to develop our residents as educators, too.

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Do the pediatric residents participate in simulation training?

Baystate Medical Center has a very robust simulation center.  Resident teams on the inpatient service participate in simulated scenarios twice on each rotation.  


Residents in the PICU go down to the center once a week as a group and work with the pediatric “patients.” NICU has a  newborn baby simulator which they have incorporated into their education program; the residents on the NICU service attend simulation once a week. 


Residents’ pagers are covered by attendings during this time so as to protect their educational experience.

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Are there any unique features of the continuity clinic?

There are many unique features of the continuity clinic. Every resident has their own patient panel that they develop over their three years of experience. We take a team approach at High Street Health Center. There are 4 practice teams, each a different color.  Each team has its own attending physician leader, nurse and medical assistant. This limits the number of providers a family is exposed to and makes communication between providers easier.


Residents get to see more than just well child visits while in continuity. A typical resident template is filled with some well child care, follow-up or return visits, urgent visits, and a newborn visit. We consider our clinic to be unique in that we place a strong emphasis on working as a team. We have solid resident to attending preceptor ratios as well as nurse and medical assistant support. Each time you are in clinic you are paired with a nurse or medical assistant to provide you with the adequate support you need for that session.


We have regular didactic sessions at 140 High Street to emphasize primary care medicine. Our attending preceptors pride themselves on their ability to empower residents and make them feel comfortable making their own medically sound, evidence based decisions on their patients. Faculty and residents have regular feedback and evaluation sessions to ensure that things are going smoothly throughout the year making the experience a positive one for everyone.


In the spring of the first year of residency, each resident meets with Dr. Stechenberg, the coordinator of the off-site continuity experience to discuss options.  Each resident has two half days of continuity sessions during ambulatory and elective months (seven months in each of the last two years).  Most of the residents elect to use that second half day for an off-site experience in either a community general pediatrics practice or a subspecialty in their second and third years.  In the past years, residents have spent time working in the pediatric infectious diseases clinic, the pediatric hematology-oncology clinic, the endocrinology clinic, pediatric GI clinic, growth and nutrition clinic, and Job Corps to name a few.  The off-site experience exposes residents to different approaches used by generalists or subspecialists in their offices. This allows them to experience what their career after residency may be like.

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What is the call schedule on different rotations?

On the inpatient service, there are four day teams, and one night team. Each PL-1 spends six weeks on the night team over the course of their first year. Scheduling needs determine how many of those weeks will be done consecutively in the same month versus being spread out over more than one month.

Inpatient Coverage

  • Inpatient teams are composed of supervising seniors and first year residents.
  • Each weekend has a senior and intern from one day team and another intern from the other day team, ensuring all patients are known to the housestaff on each day.
  • Two night teams, each composed of a senior resident and a first year resident. will cover on alternate nights for the block.
  • All patients are covered by these inpatient residents.
  • No one works 24 hour shifts.
  • All shifts comply with the ACGME requirements for duty hours and days off.


In the NICU and PICU we have a night resident so there is no overnight call. All residents on the block take their turn as the night resident. 


On all other rotations, except the emergency department, first year residents participate in the after-hours urgent care clinic which is held Monday-Thursday from 5:30 pm until the patients are gone, sometime between 7:30-10 pm, or on Saturdays or holidays from 9am-1:30 pm.


Senior residents participate in beeper call from home for the general pediatrics clinics. Senior residents also take jeopardy (NICU transports or sick call) as well as occasionally work in the after-hours urgent care.  One month in the second year and two months in the third year may be designed as call-free months if requested.

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How have the new guidelines for resident work hours impacted the pediatrics residency program?

We have worked to modify the resident's workday to accommodate the guidelines - if you are unfamiliar with them, you can review them at ACGME.  We have also made more recent changes in anticipation of new guidelines in the next two years.


Our conference block is Thursday afternoons.  Attendings cover the services so that the residents can be at conferences free from clinical responsibilities.  Our residents do very little overnight call when on electives or ambulatory rotations; they have very little disruption of their educational experiences while on those rotations. Our residents do not float in from their electives or ambulatory rotations to cover inpatient rotations. This only happens when on jeopardy, if a fellow resident cannot work their assigned shift or under other unusual circumstances.

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How does the program deal with resident stress?

We realize that residency can be a time of stress working in a new, challenging environment, caring for medically and socially complex patients and balancing work and home life. On staff there is a resident support group facilitator who is available for ad hoc meetings. Each resident is paired with a faculty advisor who acts as a support person, career counselor and overall advocate. 


There is an annual resident retreat and graduation bash for which all residents are relieved from any duties. Each class has an academic half-day in the fall and spring to learn how to be an educator and to go over issues unique to their group, such as career planning, effective teaching, etc. 


Many other social events occur throughout the year. (See Activities for a sampling.) Baystate also has a fitness center and discounts at other fitness centers.

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About Residencies or Fellowships

How many residency and fellowship programs does Baystate Medical Center have?

Baystate Medical Center has 10 ACGME-accredited residency programs and 20 fellowship programs with approximately 300 residents and fellows.

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Are residents involved in teaching medical students?

Yes. According to Baystate Medical Center policy, the position description of both residents and fellows includes:

  • participation in the educational activities of the training program
  • as appropriate, assumption of responsibility for teaching and supervising other residents and
    students
  • participation in institutional orientation and education programs and other activities involving the clinical staff.


Since Baystate Medical Center is the Western Campus of Tufts University School of Medicine, each resident is granted a Clinical Instructor faculty appointment. Baystate values teaching and the faculty and residents take their jobs as educators seriously.

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Do residents have a voice in decision-making?

Each department has an education committee on which appointed residents sit. In addition, Baystate Medical Center's Graduate Medical Education Committee has resident representatives from each program.

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Are there opportunities to meet residents and fellows from other departments?

Baystate has a number of interdepartmental educational activities designed for, or open to, residents and fellows, such as:

  • REACH (Residents Educated in Alternative Cultures and Health), whose programs are open to all with an interest in international health
  • WAAM (Women Advancing and Achieving in Medicine), an organization of women physicians and mid-level providers
  • BRASS (Baystate Residency Academic Seminar Series) that covers all the curricular topics required by the ACGME Common Requirements and Institutional Requirements in an environment that fosters collaboration across Baystate residencies and fellowships
  • Grand Rounds
  • Literature and Medicine, an award-winning, hospital-based, reading and discussion program for health care professionals
  • Schwartz Center Rounds, an open forum for caregivers to discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients

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What library resources are available?

Baystate Medical Center’s Health Sciences Library is the largest medical reference library in the region. 


Located in the Chestnut Building on the main campus of Baystate Medical Center, the library offers quality information resources and knowledge services to advance patient care, research, education, community outreach and to support the administrative aspects of health care. 


The library offers efficient access to thousands of digital and print knowledge resources, major databases and clinical information, and supports their effective use through formal instruction and consultations. Library professionals help provide accurate and timely evidence based information at the point-of-care or at other convenient locations - and we offer remote access to our electronic resources.


Service hours are Monday – Friday, 7 am to 5 pm. Ext. 4-1865

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Where do we eat at the hospital?

As housestaff, your meals at the cafeteria are subsidized by the hospital.  Every 3 months, residents receive meal money on their IDs that can be used. 


Baystate Medical Center has a very extensive selection of food in its cafeteria. Pizza, hot and cold sandwiches, traditional grill offerings, sushi, baked goods, hot breakfasts, a salad bar are available every day. Fruit, yogurt, cereal, chips are also sold. Kosher, gluten-free and vegetarian options are available. 


Atwaters Cafe, located off the main lobby of the hospital, is open in the evenings and on weekends. In addition, there are several Baystate-run cafes located on the main hospital campus and outpatient campus which residents in which residents and fellows may also use their meal money.


There are also vending machines, some of which offer hot meals, located in the cafeteria. 

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Where do we park?

Baystate Medical Center provides free, on-campus parking for residents and fellows in their own specially-designated lot that is on hospital grounds and does not require a shuttle.

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About Baystate Medical Center

Where is Baystate Medical Center?

Springfield is located in the historic Pioneer Valley of western Massachusetts on the magnificent Connecticut River. Founded in 1636, it is one of the oldest settlements in America and the third largest city in Massachusetts. With a population of ~600,000, the Springfield metro area boasts the amenities of larger cities, but with a more relaxed, small-town feeling.


Located at the intersection of Interstates 91 and 90 (Mass Pike), Springfield is only 90 minutes from Boston and 3 hours to New York City. We're also close to some of the best skiing on the East coast and are just a short trip to many scenic beaches.

 

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How does Baystate promote diversity and inclusion in the workplace?

Baystate Health is committed to fostering an environment of diversity, inclusion and cultural competence where all employees are appreciated, fully engaged and supported to work to their full potential.


For the third consecutive year, Baystate has been recognized as a "Leader in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Healthcare Equality" in the 2013 Healthcare Equality Index Report, receiving a perfect rating for its inclusive policies and treatment of the LGBT community. For years Baystate has been allowing coverage for benefits that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) prohibited.


In 2011, Baystate was named a leader in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Healthcare Equality Index (HEI), one of just six health networks in the country singled out for the honor.


Baystate Health has established a Diversity Council whose members represent a cross-section of the organization, and an Office of Diversity and Inclusion which is involved in finding better ways to recruit, retain and promote an inclusive workforce.


Examples of Baystate's diversity-related initiatives include:

  • a program for leaders designed to explore personal attitudes toward differences and help managers learn how to support an inclusive environment
  • the first regional conference on transgender health, hosted by Baystate's Office of Continuing Education, Office of Diversity, and Women Advancing and Achieving in Medicine
  • CultureVision is a comprehensive, user-friendly database that gives employees access to culturally competent patient care.
  • creation of a new international heath travel grant program by REACH (Residents Educated in Alternative Cultures and Health)

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Will Baystate help my significant other find employment?

Our Relocation Information page provides links to helpful job-seeking resources in the area. In addition, Baystate's Human Resources Department maintains a career opportunities site where current job openings can be browsed and applications submitted online.

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Is Baystate a "green" workplace?

To promote healthier communities both locally and globally, Baystate has pledged to implement and maintain operations and processes that protect our environment and support good health. It has a Green Team made up of employees from both clinical and non-clinical areas, including Environmental Services, Purchasing, Engineering, Food & Nutrition Services, Surgery, Baystate Children's Hospital, Marketing & Communications, and more. Initiatives include:

  • Using locally grown produce in Baystate Health cafeterias
  • Completing energy efficiency upgrades in hospital offices and corridors that will lower electric energy use by 20 million combined kilowatt hours over the next fifteen years, lowering operating costs, improving air quality, and reducing air pollution and gas emissions
  • Recycling paper, cardboard, metals and batteries

Baystate Medical Center’s 2012 hospital expansion embraces the principles of efficiency, sustainability and patient comfort, following the Green Guide for Health Care, the health care industry’s first quantifiable, sustainable design toolkit integrating enhanced environmental and health principles and practices into the planning, design, construction, operations and maintenance of health care facilities. The Hospital of the Future features:

  • Green vegetated roof that will reduce water run-off and cool building, adding insulation and reducing heat to roof
  • Interior skylights to bring daylight to interior spaces, reducing energy requirements.
  • Electricity also will be conserved through the use of energy-efficient lights. Light sensors will allow use of daylight whenever possible and lower lighting levels at night. 
  • Exterior lighting will be controlled to reduce lighting in the neighborhood.
  • Landscaping will emphasize native plant types and green maintenance techniques. A
    rainwater collection system and water efficient landscaping will be used for irrigation.

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Does Baystate provide child care?

There is no child care onsite, but Baystate's Preschool Enrichment Team (P.E.T.) offers all Baystate Health employees assistance with their search for high quality childcare. Services include:

  • Information and referral services to: early childhood programs, child care centers, family child care homes, nursery schools, Head Start, school age programs, and summer camps
  • Referrals for families with disabled or special needs children
  • Checklist for choosing and comparing child care settings
  • Information about a caregiver for your child in your home
  • Telephone consultation with a child care specialist
  • Child care financial support/assistance information.

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About Springfield and the Surrounding Community

What's it like to live there?

Considered the "crossroads of New England," Western Massachusetts offers convenient access to a wide variety of outstanding features that make for a rich quality of life for Baystate Health staff. 


Western Massachusetts is known for its distinguished arts community, historical sites and first-class recreational features.  Among its offerings are:

  • Some of the best skiing on the East coast in Vermont, New Hampshire and the Berkshires.
  • Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
  • Old Sturbridge Village
  • Fly fishing on some of the area's fine rivers and in the Quabbin Reservoir.
  • Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden
  • Emily Dickinson Homestead, Amherst
  • Whitewater rafting, kayaking and canoeing and other water sports.
  • Tanglewood, summer home of the Boston Pops
  • Six Flags New England Theme Park
  • Hancock Shaker Village
  • Hiking and mountain climbing in the Berkshires and White Mountains.
  • Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
  • Arrowhead, Home of Herman Melville, Pittsfield
  • Bright Nights - New England's largest holiday lighting display
  • Historic Deerfield


Our region also has a proud education tradition and is home to the Five Colleges consortium of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. (See the Life in the Pioneer Valley for information about arts and culture, outdoor recreation, weather and more.)


Springfield lies at the intersection of two major Interstate routes: the north-south I-91 and the east-west I-90 (Mass Pike), giving it convenient access to recreational and cultural opportunities in:

  • Boston (1 1/2 hours)
  • Hartford (1/2 hour)
  • New York City ( 2 1/2 hours)
  • New Haven (1 hour)

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Where should I live?

Traffic jams are virtually unheard of, so you can choose to live downtown, in a suburban community, or out in the country – even in nearby Northampton or Amherst - and still be within a 15-20 minute easy commute to the medical center. There are many attractive options whether you rent or purchase. From turn of the century farmhouses to historic brick townhouses and gracious suburban homes, housing choices are both abundant, diverse and affordable. The distinctive mix of urban and rural areas and easily accessible cultural and recreational activities makes the Pioneer Valley a uniquely pleasant place to live and work.


Many residents live in the five college community of Northampton, Amherst, Hadley and South Hadley or in nearby communities such as Easthampton, Longmeadow or the Hartford area of Connecticut. Others live in historic areas of Springfield, particularly in the Downtown or Forest Park areas. For residents with families, there are several suburbs with excellent school systems.


For helpful information about moving to our community, visit the Relocation Information page.

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